Gippsland Gold Experience

The historic old Gippsland Goldfields towns are often referred to as Victoria’s forgotten goldfields. Names such as Talbotville, Aberfeldy, Russell’s Creek, Cassilis, Bull Town and Grant are now just names of sites with no towns existing anymore. Most of the towns that sprung up in the early 1860’s and were gone by the 1940’s, however, Walhalla, the most affluent of these towns is still operating today. Walhalla has a range of accommodation and stores to ensure a pleasant stay.

Walhalla is the perfect location to learn more about the significant Goldfields of Gippsland. The Long Tunnel extended mine is open for tours on weekends and school holidays. It was for many years the major gold mine in Walhalla, and one of the richest in the State. A train ride is also available on the historic Walhalla Scenic Railway, taking passengers from the Thomson River Station through to Walhalla. It follows Stringers Creek, the original source of Walhalla’s gold rush.

A full day can be spent just wandering Walhalla taking in the historic buildings, shops and parks. This historic town in the Gully of Stringers Creek is one of the more scenic places you will ever visit. It is a far cry from when mining was in full swing and the surrounding mountains were bare, as all timber had been removed to feed the boilers to run the mines.

A visit to Walhalla’s oval is a must as well, perched on the top of the hill, which has been removed to make enough flat ground for an oval. It is said that the walk alone to the ground was enough to wear out the visiting teams. The old cemetery perched on the hillside is worth a visit as well with the graves dug in to the hillside.

For the more energetic and adventurous, the remote ghost townships in the Great Dividing Range will provide an insight in to the hardships faced by our pioneers. The remote locations of mines have saved the machinery and sites from removal by both the companies when they left and souvenir hunters since. Many of the sites such as the Old Good Hope Mine and Battery are located at the base of steep gullies.

Dargo is the perfect location to base yourself to explore the Crooked River goldfields, and a tour of the Dargo Museum before hand will show you images of what existed in the surrounding mountains. Towns that once boasted pubs, banks, police stations, stores and even newspapers are now just empty paddocks. Grant is the best example of this. Venture further a field and find old batteries and boilers still located where they were put in the 1860’s.

For further information on these goldfields, call in to our visitor centres for a book, or view www.gippslandinfo.com.au and go to tours, trail and trips

Gold has always been synonymous with the regions such as Ballarat and Bendigo, but Gippsland also has a rich gold heritage dating back to the 1860s. A brand new video has just been completed telling the story of the rise and fall of the Gippsland Goldfields and is available to view and purchase at the fabulous Long Tunnel Extended Gold Mine in Walhalla.

In the 1860s and 1870s thousands of people flocked into the mountains in search of gold and this video is set amidst some of Victoria’s most spectacular mountain scenery, stretching from Omeo in the north east to Wood’s Point in the west. Gippsland Goldfields included such places as Walhalla, Dargo and the Crooked River, the Jordan and such lesser known places as Jericho, Fulton’s Creek and Russell’s Creek.

The video traces the discovery of gold in the 1850s to the present, from the humblest miner panning along the banks of a creek to the fabulously rich Long Tunnel Extended mine at Walhalla, which in the 1890s was the richest producing gold mine in Victoria.

You can learn about panning for gold in a creek; how ore was extracted from deep underground and then broken down and smelted into bars of gold. Discover the hardships endured by the miners and their families who lived and worked in the mountains and what today remains of their endeavours.

 

 ...experience the wounderland!

   star hotel 

 

panning

 

goldpanning

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